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As much as I don’t buy books all that often, I still do manage to have a decent sized collection of them. Lately, my eyes get drawn to the shelves and piles of them in thinking about having box them up in the not too distant future for my move. For a bunch of the titles, I just have tended to keep them around so I can remember that I’ve read them, and I’d really like a better way to recognize that without so much packing poundage. A great alternative that I found is that LinkedIn has an Amazon add-on for your profile called Reading List where you can track what you’re reading or what you’ve already read.

The LinkedIn app is even better for my tastes, since so many of the books that I read are business/personal development topics anyway, if not directly relating to my day job covering software dev skills. Sure, I could also pop stuff on there like Jurassic Park or some Grishams -haven’t decided yet. Overall, the app is great for jogging my own memory, showing off hypothetical knowledge, and just give profile gawkers more info about me. Apparently, the new figure is that 93% of firms go through some recruitment searching on LinkedIn to try to fill positions. The company is also being upped overall for big results compared to other social networks (Facebook), so I’m guessing my efforts to tome dump on this walled garden is not at risk for abandonment.

If you check it out, you’d see my status marker for The Big Short shows up as ‘Reading’. After having to pass over too many newspaper pieces trying to analyze the sub-prime housing downturn, I decided I wanted a better background of the terms and cast of characters. On top of that, there’s nothing quite like 45 hrs of power loss at your home to cause you to add another physical book to my piles to help pass the time without the Internet.

(photo credit by bandita)

Unfortunately, over the last number of weeks this blog has been slowed down a lot, but I’m happy to say that my efforts had been switched up in order to go through some recruitment processes and that I have now accepted a new full-time position. My work responsibilities have been picked up quite a bit, and especially in the short term I’ll be learning new a software code base and getting introduced to anew team. As things settle down, I’m looking forward to ramping up the content over here.

As for the new job, I’m very excited for the different opportunity, and I will now be among the growing trend of those employed as a direct result of cloud computing technologies. It will also be an eye-opening experience for me from this business education front, as I now get a view of the realities for a subscription-based software business, as opposed to those that rely on licenses and upgrades for a payment model. Which, by the way, I’ve been brushing up on those topics from the text-book style book Business Model Generation.   Highly recommended, and lots of illustrations, reminding me of the Head First book series.  More topics for another day…

(photo credit “Social network in a course” by hanspodolja)

books collection

Getting started with my MBA Frontier project, I’m going to make sure I have a plan for the low-hanging fruit activities. The core of any course of study whether instructed or not would be the published literature and reference material on the subject. This is going to be no different for me and my goal, and through any number of books I’ll be able to tout my knowledge as enclosed under some in-your-face or epic sounding title -matching up pretty closely with my mission there.

Fortunately, a lot of this work about the best MBA-substituting books has already been done for me (us!) via the Personal MBA Reading List, administered by Josh Kaufman. Updates for the 2012 version of this list were completed as of a month ago. I reformatted this into a crude spreadsheet / checklist doc if anybody else is interested (PersonalMBA-ReadingList-2012.xls). At first glance of the list, there are absolutely some titles I’d expect to find, and even some I’ve already got under my belt. I’m definitely looking forward to getting into these topics, and work through such works that have already gone through many iterations of scrutiny.  This year the list has been broken into categories as follows:

  • Business Creation
  • Value-Creation & Testing
  • Marketing
  • Sales
  • Value-Delivery
  • Finance & Accounting
  • Productivity & Effectiveness
  • Problem Solving
  • The Human Mind
  • Behavioral Change
  • Communication
  • Influence
  • Decision-Making
  • Negotiation
  • Management
  • Leadership
  • Project Management
  • Systems
  • Analysis
  • Statistics
  • Corporate Skills
  • Corporate Strategy
  • Creativity & Innovation
  • Design
  • Consulting

The reading list is at the same time exciting as it is daunting, particularly with some of my other reading goals that I’ve already got on tap (and which I’d like to write on later). At least for the time being, I would like to get through one PMBA book in a month. This will be bolstered by my other reading, and another book I’ll spin up on my car stereo over my daily commutes. It’s not high academia rigor I’m putting on my plate, but as Leo Babauta mentions in an entire chapter of the PMBA recommended The Power of Less: “Start Small” and you’ll be setting yourself firm footing for true habit formation.

Please speak up for any tips that could help me, particularly from the students who already have overcome their deluge of reading.

photo credit- “Bookshelf” by heipei

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